In Search of the Lean Six Life

Smarter, not harder. Preferrably A LOT smarter.


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The Limits of Repurposing Stuff

This spring’s lesson: don’t repurpose excess Dixie cups for starting seeds.

The wrong container for starting seeds

Man that’s gross

Seriously. Ewww. The last thing we want around baby plants is this much mold.

Now, emptied K-cups make a great holder for the hydrated peat pellets – they even have a built in hole, whereas I had to (carefully) punch a hole in the bottom of the water cups. But they were very small and all my baby plants quickly out grew them, making them almost more hassle than it was worth.

Maybe some year I’ll break down and buy some “professional” seed starting equipment… Naaaah, probably not.


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A Dream of One

Funny how sometimes you don’t realize you have a dream until someone else is living it.

This week, I learned that person is Daniel Markovitz.

OK, not literally.  I don’t actually know Mr. Markovitz is, or what his life is like. But I learned of his book, Factory of One: Applying Lean Principles to Banish Waste and Improve Your Personal Performance, and I wanted to cry. With joy at finding such an awesome book, and with despair at realizing I wanted to write that book.

And it’s a good book so far. I can’t even pursue the “well I’ll do the same thing only better” angle.  Sigh.


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Gratuitous Post about Lean

This blog is not “supposed” to be a garden blog, nor a recipe blog, even though that seems to be what I post the most!  So this morning: a gratuitous post about “Lean”, specifically the Lean in Lean Six Sigma which inspired the name of this blog.

Lean is a production / manufacturing approach which focuses on eliminating all waste, e.g., anything (in terms of time or material resources) which does not contribute to the creation of the final product.   This actually translates well into personal productivity, in terms of removing all the “stuff” from your life or work which does not deliver any value.  (The hard part is defining what value actually means to you…but that is a whole separate post!)

The classic seven “wastes” to be on the look out for (as identified in the original Lean process, the Toyota Production System) are as follow:

1) Overproduction

2) Inventory

3) Waiting (idle time)

4) Unnecessary movement of material

5) Overprocessing or incorrect processing

6) Motion

7) Defects

The one which seems to drive me most is #3 – Idle Time.  This goes beyond “idle hands make the Devil’s work” – I can’t stand to stand around, doing nothing. I’m always looking for some little task to do to fill up moments when I am waiting for something else to happen.  This actually has a negative affect, in that this often leads (for me personally) to multitasking, which is its own form of waste.  (The fine balance between “idle time” and “set up time” is another post brewing in the back of my mind.)   In addition, I often start new projects before the old ones are finished, which means I end up with multiple works-in-progress (WIPs) in the system (aka my value added activities) which often leads to 5) incorrect processing because I lose track of what I’m doing and therefor 7) defects.  I’m starting to research kanban systems as a way to preemptively limit  WIPs.  But that brings me back to my original problem – sometimes in a process (baking, gardening, etc) you just have to wait.

And I hate waiting.


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My Inner Hunter-Gatherer

Getting in touch with my inner hunter-gatherer this evening…

image

Wineberries and blackberries from wild patches in our yard. The blackberries have never been this good before – usually our area has serious rain shortages this time of year. But now we’re inspired to better mind the plants and run a soaker hose asking the plants next year. In a week or two, we will have more blackberries than we know what to do with!

…p.s., finding wineberries in the yard was much more charming before someone used the words “invasive species” to describe them to me.  Too bad all invasive species can’t be useful!


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Random Bounty

So I don’t mean to keep posting about gardening – I’ve actually been contemplating some real Lean / Lean Six Sigma-applied-to-life type posts – but hey. Eliminating waste is part of Lean, and much of my gardening is about not-wasting.

Enter: today’s random bounty. While mowing, my husband spotted this weed growing under some other weeds. Only this weed looked, well, like something that might be cultivatable. (No, that is probably not a real word!)

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This turns out to be a source of these:

Dish of Japanese wineberries

Japanese wineberries!  Random, weird, wonderful.  This goes along with the wild blackberries, elderberry, and highly unanticipated mulberry tree which have all turned up in our yard this year!

Can I actually make wine of them?  No way to know!  They’ve all been eaten already!


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When life throws you pomegranates…duck, ’cause they hurt if they hit you!

I love the arrival of pomegranates in the shopping markets in the fall.  I always buy one or two every year because they are pretty, and tasty; and you can even use the rinds to make an all-natural brown dye if you are into dying fabric and yarn and what-not.  What a great little fruit!

Unfortunately, my family’s pomegranate enthusiasm wanes pretty quickly about halfway through the first one.  This year is no exception.  I have a cup of arils sitting in the fridge right now, lonely and neglected.  I decided to find a recipe to use them up, so they won’t go to waste.

Most pomegranate recipes out there seem to call for juice, or crushed pulp.  Too bad for me!  You can’t get much of either out of one cup of arils!  However we do have – randomly enough – a bottle of pomegranate/cranberry juice we got for free from Safeway with our purchase of Snow White.  (No, I still haven’t figured out why, exactly!)  And while pomegranate/cranberry is not the same, I think it will work just fine for my waste-minimizing needs.

Here’s my base recipe: http://pomwonderful.com/recipes/persian-chicken-in-pom-walnut-sauce-2/

Only I have to make several changes, since my actual ingredients-on-hand are different.  Here’s my updated ingredients list.

  • 1 cup Pomegranate-Cranberry Juice
  • 1/4 cup arils from 1 large pomegranate
  • 1 4 x 4-inch double-thick piece of cheesecloth
  • 1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped walnuts
  • 1 1/3 cups chicken broth
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 tablespoon buckwheat honey (I don’t have any molasses, but buckwheat honey is similar in flavor and consistency; I may have to add more, to balance the tartness of the cranberry juice)
  • 6 pork chops
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil
  • 1/2 Spanish onion, sliced
  • Hot cooked brown rice pilaf
    Garnish:

  • 1/2 cup arils from 1 large pomegranate